Tue. Sep 22nd, 2020
Gog/Magog Revisited: Modern Myths and Theories versus Actual biblical Prophecy (End-times Prophecy Revisited Book 4)

Gog/Magog Revisited: Modern Myths and Theories versus Actual biblical Prophecy (End-times Prophecy Revisited Book 4)

Some of the most popular end-time prophecy theories and scenarios have Ezekiel’s Gog/Magog prophecy either beginning to be fulfilled in our own time, or in the near future, or at least some time during the Tribulation Period. This book addresses this subject, evaluating several of the mainstream views with respect to a close examination of what scripture has to say about it. An alternative understanding is proposed, based on the assumption that if we let scripture speak for itself, taking the literal approach to interpretation, letting scripture interpret scripture, the answers are actually quite clear and uncomplicated. Furthermore the scenario that emerges from such an approach is logically consistent and believable, unlike those that are currently more widely accepted – which are fraught with contradictions both scripturally and logically. This work is an attempt to address the following questions:
1. If we apply the commonly accepted rules of exegesis and hermeneutics (i.e. interpretation of scripture) with intellectual integrity (applying the same rules to our own interpretation as we do to the interpretations of our opponents), does scripture really teach that Gog and his army will appear on the scene in the near future, or during the Tribulation Period, along with the Antichrist?
2. Are there really sound biblical reasons to believe that there will be two huge battles led by two different characters referred to in scripture as “Gog” associated with “Magog,” both with the same objective (destroy Israel) and the same outcome (obliteration by divine intervention)?
3. Did John overlook such a key and major global conflagration as Ezekiel’s Gog invasion such that he doesn’t even mention it in his most complete and detailed book of Revelation, which is specifically about that very period? Is then the Gog he does tell us about another Gog which is to come over a thousand years later? Is it really sound and intellectually honest exegesis of scripture which indicates that the Gog of Ezekiel is not the same as the Gog of Revelation, or is it the result of theoretical presuppositions and circular reasoning